Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives
Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives

Graham Hood Papers of Bonnin and Morris Porcelain Manufactory Edit

Summary

Identifier
HOO

Dates

  • 1965-1976, undated (Creation)

Extents

  • 1 linear foot (Whole)

Agent Links

Notes

  • Abstract

    This collection consists primarily of correspondence curator and scholar Graham Hood generated during his 1965 to 1970 research of America's first porcelain manufactory, and during and after the publication of his book regarding the same. The work, entitled "Bonnin and Morris of Philadelphia: the first American porcelain factory, 1770-1772," was published in 1972. The collection also contains photographs, which include those used in the book, reports and other writings. The folder-level inventory included with the collection was created in 2002.

  • Processing Information

    These materials were arranged and described by Bertha Adams. Funded by a grant from The Institute of Museum and Library Services.

  • Access Restrictions

    This collection is open for research.

  • Use Restrictions

    The Graham Hood Papers of Bonnin and Morris Porcelain Manufactory are the physical property of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Archives. The Museum holds literary rights only for material created by Museum personnel or given to the Museum with such rights specifically assigned. For all other material, literary rights, including copyright, belong to the authors or their legal heirs and assigns. Researchers are responsible for obtaining permission from rights holders for publication and for other purposes where stated.

  • Preferred Citation

    [Item identification and date], [Series info.], Graham Hood Papers of Bonnin and Morris Porcelain Manufactory, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Archives.

  • Acquisition and Custody Information

    Gift of Graham Hood, 2001.

  • Historical Note

    In 1965 when he began his research of the porcelain manufactory established by Bonnin and Morris, Graham Hood was Associate Curator of the Garvan and Related Collections of American Art at Yale University Art Gallery. At the close of the decade Hood was working at the Detroit Institute of Art as curator of American Art. During the early 1970s, Hood accepted a position at Colonial Williamsburg, where he served as vice president for collections and museums and Carlisle H. Humelsine curator until his retirement in December 1997. His book, "Bonnin and Morris of Philadelphia: the first American porcelain factory, 1770-1772," was published in 1972. Hood has also written about American silver, the Governor's Palace in Williamsburg, Virginia and Charles Bridges and William Dering, two painters of colonial Virginia. He also edited the catalogue to the 1970 exhibition of the Robert Hudson Tannahill bequest to the Detroit Institute of Arts.

    The subject, which according to Hood spasmodically occupied his leisure time over a five-year period, was the business established in 1770 by Gousse Bonnin and George Anthony Morris in the Southwark section of Philadelphia. Their ambitious project was to manufacture soft-paste porcelain using clay from the banks of the Delaware River, near Wilmington, Delaware, and employing skilled English workmen to produce their wares. Operating as the American China Manufactory, the business was short-lived, closing in 1772. Despite its brief operation, the venture staked by Bonnin and Morris was significant. It was the first porcelain manufactory in colonial America, and in fact the only one in the eighteenth century. The task Graham Hood assumed was to determine definitively if the wares attributed to Bonnin and Morris were truly theirs and if so, whether the objects were porcelain or earthenware. Hood's research literally went to the source of his questions; that is, to the site where the manufactory once stood. Because the subject so intrigued Dr. John Cotter, a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania, he took his archaeological class to investigate the site. This in turn led to an excavation done in the fall of 1967 by Paul R. Huey and Garry Wheeler Stone. Dr. Cotter's class prepared an additional investigative report the following summer. Hood gave the shards uncovered during the excavation to the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

  • Scope and Content Note

    This collection consists primarily of correspondence Graham Hood generated during his 1965 to 1970 research of America's first porcelain manufactory, and during and after the publication of his book regarding the same. The work, entitled "Bonnin and Morris of Philadelphia: the first American porcelain factory, 1770-1772," was published in 1972. The collection also contains photographs, which include those used in the book, reports and other writings. Many of the letters pertain to two significant aspects of Hood's research; namely, his travel to England to study related ceramics and the archaeological excavation of the factory site conducted in the fall of 1967 by Paul R. Huey and Garry Wheeler Stone. A bound volume of their reports and drawings is included as well as a report of an investigation project conducted the following summer by Dr. John Cotter and his archaeology students at the University of Pennsylvania. The folder-level inventory included with the collection was created in 2002.

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