Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives
Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives

Anne Terhune Research Collection of Thomas Hovenden Edit

Summary

Identifier
TER

Dates

  • circa 1983-2006 (Creation)

Extents

  • 10.5 linear feet (Whole)

Notes

  • Abstract

    None available.

  • Processing Information

    These materials were arranged and described by Bertha Adams. Funded by a grant from The Institute of Museum and Library Services.

  • Access Restrictions

    The collection is open for research.

  • Use Restrictions

    The Anne Terhune Research Collection of Thomas Hovenden is the physical property of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Archives. The Museum holds literary rights only for material created by Museum personnel or given to the Museum with such rights specifically assigned. For all other material, literary rights, including copyright, belong to the authors or their legal heirs and assigns. Researchers are responsible for obtaining permission from rights holders for publication and for other purposes where stated.

  • Scope and Content Note

    Art historian Anne Gregory Terhune (1921-2005) created these records in her research of Irish-American artist Thomas Hovenden (1840-1895). In addition to her 1983 dissertation, Terhune's most notable study of Hovenden was a critical biography, "Thomas Hovenden: His Life and Art," which was published in 2006 by University of Pennsylvania Press. The materials comprising this collection appear to have been created primarily for these two projects. The bulk of material consists of index cards, most of which Terhune organized by subject and often annotated with supporting commentary and bibliographic references. Most of her research files are also identified by subject and consist of clippings, correspondence, notes and photographs. Much of the primary and secondary source materials are photocopies, including the artist's sketchbook and lecture notes. There are also individual index cards and files for many of Hovenden's works of art. Terhune also compiled a photograph album consisting of copy prints of many images pertaining to Hovenden, his career and his family. Notes accompany many of the photos. The collection also includes a large number of slides Terhune used to illustrate her lectures, as well as correspondence files, manuscript drafts, lecture notes and exhibition research. Because Terhune often made extensive notations on a folder, originals (or copies of) have been maintained.

Components